How To Use Jupyter Notebook In 2020: A Beginner’s Tutorial

How To Use Jupyter Notebook In 2020: A Beginner’s Tutorial

August 24, 2020What is Jupyter Notebook?

The Jupyter Notebook is an incredibly powerful Toko Notebook Medan tool for interactively developing and presenting data science projects. This article will walk you through how to use Jupyter Notebooks for data science projects and how to set it up on your local machine.

First, though: what is a “notebook”?

A notebook integrates code and its output into a single document that combines visualizations, narrative text, maDistributor Notebook Medan thematical equations, and other rich media. In other words: it’s a single document where you can run code, display the output, and also add explanations, formulas, charts, and make your work more Harga Notebook Medan transparent, understandable, repeatable, and shareable.

Using Notebooks is now a major part of the data science workflow at companies across the globe. Grosir Notebook Medan If your goal is to work Jual Notebook Medan with data, using a Notebook will speed up your workflow and make it easier to communicate and share your results.

Best of all, as part of the open source Project Jupyter, Jupyter Notebooks are completely free. You can download the aplikasi on its own, or as part of the Anaconda data science toolkit.

Although it is possible to use many different programming languages in Jupyter Notebooks, this article will focus on Python, as it is the most common use case. (Among R users, R Studio tends to be a more popular choice).How to Follow This Tutorial

To get the most out of this tutorial you should be familiar with programming — Python and pandas specifically. That said, if you have experience with another language, the Python in this article shouldn’t be too cryptic, and will still help you get Jupyter Notebooks set up locally.

Jupyter Notebooks can also act as a flexible platform for getting to grips with pandas and even Python, as will become apparent in this tutorial.

We will:Cover the basics of installing Jupyter and creating your first notebookDelve deeper and learn all the important terminologyExplore how easily notebooks can be shared and published online.

(In fact, this article was written as a Jupyter Notebook! It’s published here in read-only form, but this is a good example of how versatile notebooks can be. In fact, most of our programming tutorials and even our Python courses were created using Jupyter Notebooks).Example Data Analysis in a Jupyter Notebook

First, we will walk through setup and a sample analysis to answer a real-life question. This will demonstrate how the flow of a notebook makes data science tasks more intuitive for us as we work, and for others once it’s time to share our work.

So, let’s say you’re a data analyst and you’ve been tasked with finding out how the profits of the largest companies in the US changed historically. You find a data set of Fortune 500 companies spanning over 50 years since the list’s first publication in 1955, put together from Fortune’s public archive. We’ve gone ahead and created a CSV of the data you can use here.

As we shall demonstrate, Jupyter Notebooks are perfectly suited for this investigation. First, let’s go ahead and install Jupyter.Installation

The easiest way for a beginner to get started with Jupyter Notebooks is by installing Anaconda.

Anaconda is the most widely used Python distribution for data science and comes pre-loaded with all the most popular libraries and tools.

Some of the biggest Python libraries included in Anaconda include NumPy, pandas, and Matplotlib, though the full 1000+ list is exhaustive.

Anaconda thus lets us hit the ground running with a fully stocked data science workshop without the hassle of managing countless installations or worrying about dependencies and OS-specific (read: Windows-specific) installation issues.

To get Anaconda, simply:Download the latest version of Anaconda for Python tiga.8.Install Anaconda by following the instructions on the download laman and/or in the executable.

If you are a more advanced user with Python already installed and prefer to manage your packages manually, you can just use pip:pip3 install jupyterCreating Your First Notebook

In this section, we’re going to learn to run and save notebooks, familiarize ourselves with their structure, and understand the interface. We’ll become intimate with some core terminology that will steer you towards a practical understanding of how to use Jupyter Notebooks by yourself and set us up for the next section, which walks through an example data analysis and brings everything we learn here to life.Running Jupyter

On Windows, you can run Jupyter via the shortcut Anaconda adds to your start sajian, which will open a new tab in your default web browser that should look something like the following screenshot.

This isn’t a notebook just yet, but don’t panic! There’s not much to it. This is the Notebook Dashboard, specifically designed for managing your Jupyter Notebooks. Think of it as the launchpad for exploring, editing and creating your notebooks.

Be aware that the dashboard will give you access only to the files and sub-folders contained within Jupyter’s start-up directory (i.e., where Jupyter or Anaconda is installed). However, the start-up directory can be changed.

It is also possible to start the dashboard on any system via the command prompt (or terminal on Unix systems) by entering the command jupyter notebook; in this case, the current working directory will be the start-up directory.

With Jupyter Notebook open in your browser, you may have noticed that the URL for the dashboard is something like https://localhost:8888/tree. Localhost is not a website, but indicates that the content is being served from your local machine: your own computer.

Jupyter’s Notebooks and dashboard are web apps, and Jupyter starts up a local Python server to serve these apps to your web browser, making it essentially platform-independent and opening the door to easier sharing on the web.

(If you don’t understand this yet, don’t worry — the important point is just that although Jupyter Notebooks opens in your browser, it’s being hosted and run on your local machine. Your notebooks aren’t actually on the web until you decide to share them.)

The dashboard’s interface is mostly self-explanatory — though we will come back to it briefly later. So what are we waiting for? Browse to the folder in which you would like to create your first notebook, click the “New” drop-down button in the top-right and select “Python 3”:

Hey presto, here we are! Your first Jupyter Notebook will open in new tab — each notebook uses its own tab because you can open multiple notebooks simultaneously.

If you switch back to the dashboard, you will see the new file Untitled.ipynb and you should see some green text that tells you your notebook is running.What is an ipynb File?

The short answer: each .ipynb arsip is one notebook, so each time you create a new notebook, a new  .ipynb file will be created.

The longer answer: Each .ipynb arsip is a text arsip that describes the contents of your notebook in a format called JSON. Each cell and its contents, including image attachments that have been converted into strings of text, is listed therein along with some metadata.

You can edit this yourself — if you know what you are doing! — by selecting “Edit > Edit Notebook Metadata” from the sajian bar in the notebook. You can also view the contents of your notebook files by selecting “Edit” from the controls on the dashboard

However, the key word there is can. In most cases, there’s no reason you should ever need to edit your notebook metadata manually.The Notebook Interface

Now that you have an open notebook in front of you, its interface will hopefully not look entirely alien. After all, Jupyter is essentially just an advanced word processor.

Why not take a look around? Check out the menus to get a feel for it, especially take a few moments to scroll down the list of commands in the command palette, which is the small button with the keyboard icon (or Ctrl + Shift + P).

There are two fairly prominent terms that you should notice, which are probably new to you: cells and kernels are key both to understanding Jupyter and to what makes it more than just a word processor. Fortunately, these concepts are not difficult to understand.A kernel is a “computational engine” that executes the code contained in a notebook document.A cell is a container for text to be displayed in the notebook or code to be executed by the notebook’s kernel.Cells

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